On This Day in North Carolina, US and World History

March 13

1781    Sir William Herschel discovered Uranus, he named it ‘Georgium Sidus,’ in honor of King George III.

1793     Eli Whitney patents the cotton gin

1821  North Carolina’s first attorney general, Waightstill Avery, died in Morganton.

A native of Connecticut, the Princeton-educated Avery came to North Carolina by way of Edenton in 1769 and was granted permission to practice law in the state. While living in Charlotte in 1772, Avery was elected to serve in the provincial assembly.

He was a signer of the 1775 Mecklenburg Resolves that declared all laws of the British Crown void and suspended authority of the King and Parliament.

Instrumental in establishing North Carolina’s early statehood, Avery served on the committee to draft the state’s first constitution and literally wrote most of the document. He attended the first meeting of the General Assembly held in New Bern in 1777, and while there was appointed North Carolina’s first attorney general.

For his part in the revolutionary cause, Lord Charles Cornwallis had Avery’s office set afire.

Married with four children, Avery joined his family in Burke County at Swan Pond plantation after the Revolution. Between 1782 and 1796 he served several terms in the state House of Commons and one senate term.

Avery was known for his manners, gentlemanly demeanor and his adherence to colonial-style dress.

 1918     Women are scheduled to march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York due to a shortage of men.

1918 Women are scheduled to march in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade in New York due to a shortage of men.
1935 A three-thousand-year-old archive is found in Jerusalem confirming biblical history.

 

1937    Maj. Gen. Henry Wolfe Butner, a native of Surry County North Carolina and commander of the First Artillery Brigade in World War I, died. Butner received the Distinguished Service Medal and the Silver Star among other commendations for his wartime service.  He was also briefly the commander at Fort Bragg Army Base in North Carolina.

 

1941 Hitler issues an edict calling for an invasion of the Soviet Union.
1942 Julia Flikke of the Nurse Corps becomes the first woman colonel in the U.S. Army.
1974 The U.S. Senate votes 54-33 to restore the death penalty.

 

March 5, 1929 David Dunbar Buick Dies

In 1869 David Dunbar Buick dropped out of school at age 15 to assist his fulfilling his family’s financial need by taking a job at a plumbing goods company. When the company ran into trouble in 1882 Buick and a partner bought it out, revitalizing it and turning it into a successful business once again.

That all changed in the 1890s when Buick discovered a new interest, internal combustion engines. The plumbing company was sold and Buick used his new free time and capital to start the Buick Auto-Vim and Power Company in 1899, which produced motor-car bodies and internal combustion engines for agricultural use. He quickly turned to automotive development and after creating a revolutionary “valve in-head” overhead valve engine, he founded Buick Motor Company in 1903 with a loan from friend and fellow auto enthusiast Benjamin Briscoe. David Dunbar Buick was the creator of the infant Model B back in 1904. This is how the Buick history started, and today it’s growing to be one of the most successful luxury American car brands out there.

In 1911, four years ahead of Ford, Buick introduced its first closed-body car and by 1914, the company introduced the 5-passenger Touring which, as the name implies, could seat up to 5 passengers.

1906 Buick Touring, #131, By F. D. Richards, CC2.0 https://flic.kr/p/Ldx5Xc

Today Buick is a leading luxury American car brand; we invite you to stop by Bleecker Buick GMC in Red Springs, NC and discover for yourself why the legendary Buick lives on. Bleecker Buick GMC is located at 926 E. 4th Avenue in Red Springs, NC 28377, between Ft Bragg / Fayetteville and Lumberton North Carolina. From I-95 it is exit 20, about 10 miles on Hwy 211 to Red Springs, dealership is on the left. Call us toll free at: (866) 662-1260.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

F. D. Richards, CC2.0 https://flic.kr/p/Ldx5Xc\
www.wikipedia.org
www.automotivehistory.org